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Phytoremediation


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Phyto or phytoe that is the question
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Phyto or phytoe, that is the question

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What with Dan Quayle inventing a new way to spell potato(e), and Al Gore inventing the internet, one could be forgiven for thinking (like the guy at the US patent office in the last century) that there was nothing else left to invent.

Enter phytoremediation, OK OK so it's not new, but the things you can do with it are, all you need to do is grow willow trees on contaminated land and with a couple of lateral leaps you can:-

  1. clean-up various nasties such as heavy metals by
  2. growing a renewable resource that can be coppiced and
  3. used as a NFFO (non fossil fuel obligation) feedstock in power stations
  4. attracting European Community funds for a renewable energy project

And best of all it ensures a good supply of ready material to make all those hampers on display at Henley, whilst listening to the 'crack of leather on willow' at Lords (yup thats what hereditary Peers get upto!)

 

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There is a definite surge of interest in Phytoremediation in terms of questions addressed to the 'Ask-a-Guru' part of the website. The following points have been raised to date:-

  1. BIORENEW Phytoremediation project
  2. Phytoremediation - information needed
  3. Phytoremediation - MSc project
  4. Phytoremediation project - collaborators/funds sought

 

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  1. Program Element 6: Acceleration
  2. Dr. Husein Ajwa
  3. ASAEEvents
  4. Banks et al.
  5. Berkeley CampusNews
  6. Waste Management and Bioengineering Homepage
  7. Biographies
  8. Biomining the Soil to Remove Heavy Metals
  9. Coastal Post Article - Bioneers Walk Path For A Sustainable Future
  10. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research
  11. Bioremediation and Related Programs in DOE
  12. Bioremediation of Inorganics
  13. Bioremediation Discussion Group
  14. Life Sciences in the 21st Century: Biotechnology
  15. The Tax Relief Act and phytoremediation of Brownfields
  16. CAIC 1995 Abstracts - Rooney et al.
  17. Calendar of Events
  18. Cincinnati Research Progress
  19. Phytoremediation of Contaminated Soil
  20. CV.93.3
  21. DoD Environmental Security
  22. Environment
  23. Environmental Engineering Focus Area
  24. EPA Research Technology Development Forum site
  25. Gardea-Torresdey et al. (1)
  26. Gardea-Torresdey et al. (2)
  27. Proceedings of the 10th Annual Conference on Hazardous Waste Research
  28. Rice U. Environmental Sci + Eng: Dr. Hughes' Recent Works
  29. 103(12)Innovations
  30. In Situ Remediation IP Technology Summary Chapter 2
  31. Summary of IPS-95
  32. Jordahl et al.
  33. Kansas State University phytoremediation page
  34. December 1995 Monthly Alert
  35. Treating Produced Water by Imitating Natural Ecosystems Page
  36. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
  37. Peterson et al.
  38. PHYTONET news group
  39. PI/TSB 11/95 Agenda 2
  40. Research Highlights
  41. Annual Report - Research Projects
  42. NBBPR Research
  43. Japanese Research
  44. Energy/Environment Cost-Shared Research
  45. Senior Thesis Research
  46. Research Topics-Ecology
  47. Rice University Scholarly Interests 94-95: Environmental Science and Engineering
  48. Rooney et al.
  49. Schnoor et al.
  50. Stacy's Home Page
  51. Strand et. al., 1995
  52. Technology Evaluations Page
  53. USA 002
  54. Project Description-University of Washington
  55. Phytoremediation of Wastewater Effluent Disposal
  56. Weekly Job Announcements

 

Phytoremediation bibliography

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  1. Alfalfa plants and associated microorganisms promote biodegradation rather than volatilization of roganic substances from ground water, Davis, L.C., Muralidharan, N. Visser, V.P., Chaffin, C., Fateley, W.G., Erickson, L.E., and Hammaker, R.M., in Bioremediation Through Rhizosphere Technology, T.A. Anderson and J.R. Coats, Eds., ACS Symposium Series No. 563 Washington D.C., pp. 112-122, 1994.

  2. Beneficial effects of plants in the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water, Shimp, J.F., Tracy, J.C., Davis, L.C., Lee, E., Huang, W., Erickson, L.E., and Schnoor, J.L., Critical Reviews in Environmental Control, Vol 23, No. 1, pp. 41-47, 1993.

  3. Effects of climatological variability on the performance of vegetative systems in remediateing contaminated soil, Tracy, J.C., Ramireddy, H., Erickson, L.E., and Davis, L.C., Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association, 87th Meeting, Paper No. 94-WA86.01, 1994.

  4. Modeling the beneficial effects of vegetation in the management of landfill leachates, Tracy, J.C., Erickson, L.E, Shimp, J.F., and Davis, L.C., Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association, 85th Meeting, Paper No. 92-27.03, 1992.

  5. Modeling the effects of plants on the bioremediation of contaminated soil and ground water, Davis, L.C., Erickson, L.E., Lee, E., Shimp, J.F., and Tracy, J.C., Environmental Progress, Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 67-75, 1993.

  6. Monitoring the Beneficial Effects of Plants in Bioremediation of Volatile Organic Compounds, L.C. Davis, C. Chaffin, N. Muralidharan, V.P. Visser, W.G. Fateley, L.E. Erickson and R.M. Hammaker, Proceedings of the Conference on Hazardous Waste Research, pp. 236-250, Kansas State University, May 25-26, 1993

  7. Monitoring Plant Bioremediation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Using Open Path Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometry, R.M. Hoffman, V.P. Visser, L.C. Davis, L.E. Erickson, N. Muralidharan, R.M. Hammaker, and W.G. Fately, Proceedings of the Conference on Hazardous Waste Remediation, (in press) 1994.

  8. Rate limited degradation of hazardous organic contaminants in the root zone of a soil, Tracy, J.C., Erickson, L.E., and Davis, L.C., Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association, 86th Meeting, Paper No. 93-WA-89.02, 1993.

  9. Using vegetation to enhance in situ bioremediation, Erickson, L.E., Banks, M.K., Davis, L.C., Schwab, A.P., Muralidharan, N., Reilley, K., and Tracy, J.C., Environmental Progress, (in press), 1994.

  10. Vegetative remediation of superfund sites, Pierzynski, G., Schnoor, J., Banks, M.K., Tracy, J.C., Licht, L.A., and Erickson, L.E., in Mining and its Environmental Impact, R.E. Hester and R.M. Harrison Eds., Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, pp. 49-69, 1994.

 

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